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Purple stem of a Prickly Pear hidden in a bed of dormant grass blades

A roar of color and form…

Dan Flores

Color & form

Dan Flores also wrote about the Texas Canyonlands area and “its highly hued beauty,” in his August 2007 Texas Monthly article titled “Land that I Love.” Flores describes the Texas Canyonlands as “a roar of color and form, a profusion of Canyonlands” where “the ground suddenly falls away in a series of trap doors to reveal hidden worlds, plunging as deep as one thousand feet below the flat, dull plain…”

In the foreword to Flores' and artist Amy Winton's enchanting book, Canyon Visions: Photographs and Pastels of the Texas Plains, Larry McMurtry wrote that the Texas Canyonlands possess “the power… to arouse in us a sense of the long, long movements of time—a sense, if you will, of the eternal.”

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Opuntia spinosbacca, (Spiny-Fruited Prickly Pear)

Blooming Cholla from Impossible Canyon

Golden crownbeard (Verbesina encelioides) basking in the morning sun on the banks of the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River

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Mesquites, Cedars and tall grasses covering the canyon floor along Big Rough Creek

Late autumn foliage along the banks of a canyon-fed creek that flows into the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River in Longhorn Valley

Striated colors along an eroded canyon wall in Impossible Canyon

Milk quartz accents the red-clay soils found on a canyon floor

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Bulbous rock face worn smooth by erosion lines a narrow ravine in Impossible Canyon

Exotic-looking mud nests of Barn Swallows, found along the underside of a highway bridge in Fisher County, Texas

Clear, shallow waters along the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River

Gnarled trunk of weathered lifeless Mesquite tree