Image described below

View of Cooper Mountain from Impossible Canyon

Mountain landmarks

At the west end of these canyonlands lies Cooper Mountain, a landmark in Scurry and Kent counties. This tableland mesa, carved by the river, rises several hundred feet above the landscape and provided a strategic position for the Comanches in one of their last battles with the frontier soldiers in the 1870s.

Image described below
Image described below

Randy Bacon

Cooper Mountain

Double Mountain

Reproduced with permission from Randy Bacon

As the Double Mountain Fork connects with the creeks and canyons and flows on east, into Fisher and Stonewall Counties, the river passes the largest of the tableland mountains, the Double Mountain.

At an elevation of 2,400 feet, the Double Mountain rises like a giant mesa over 600 feet above the range land and canyons below. “The mountain dominates the surrounding plain, expressing a stalwart grandeur. As a well-known Texas landmark, Double Mountain evokes the state’s exploratory history.” (Lawton and Vogel, 2007)

Image described below

Panorama of the southern elevation of Double Mountain

Image described below

Aerial orthophoto composite map of Double Mountain

NAIP

The second image of Double Mountain seen above is a composite map created from aerial orthophoto published by the National Agricultural Imaging Program. To view the entire Double Mountain quadrant and four other composite images that encompass the Brazos River Canyonlands, use the following links:

Image described below
Image described below

A windwill glistens in sunlight above a field of grasses adjacent to Double Mountain

A barbed-wire fence, an iconic fixture of west Texas, shown with a silhouetted Double Mountain in the background